Conversions API: Google’s Way to See Offline Purchases

Conversions API: Google’s Way to See Offline Purchases
Having a broadband connection at home is almost an assurance that your surfing data will be obtained by huge companies like Google.

Google is the undisputed internet giant. It is the company that serves the most number of advertisements over the internet and rakes in the biggest revenue in the ads market. But they are never resting on their laurels, so to speak. With their latest project called Conversions API, they are looking to acquire offline purchasing data of consumers all over the world and integrate them into their online ad serving mechanisms.

Google is known to collect anonymous data from a user’s web surfing habits. But right now, they’re going one step further. They are currently on their way to acquiring data from malls and offline stores then add it to the ones they obtain online. This allows the company to serve and target more specific ads to consumers. However, many users say that the feeling is like Google is always looking at a person’s buying habits – and they’re doing it not just over the internet these days but offline as well.

Having a broadband connection at home is almost an assurance that your surfing data will be obtained by huge companies like Google. What people are not prepared for is the fact that every time they go to the mall these days, the same thing happens. Not that it’s a bad thing. However, this only shows that the line between public domain and a person’s privacy gets thinner by the second. Although the data obtained is regarded as fully anonymous, individuals still can’t help thinking about that invisible eye always around them, watching their every move every time that they get into a store to purchase anything.

Google started the Conversions API with the intention of serving better ads to consumers while giving a better service to their advertisers. They believe that the data that they obtain online is not really complete unless real world data is integrated into it. And since the company maintains that they are getting anonymous data from actual consumers, they are not really violating anybody’s rights. This may be the case. But then again, that queasy feeling still remains.

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